Theodore Payne California Native Plant Database




Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia

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Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia
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Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia
Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia
Enlarge
Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia
Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia
Enlarge
Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia

Species Name: Quercus agrifolia var. agrifolia
Common Name: Coast Live Oak or Encina

One of the fastest growing oaks and a local native. High wildlife value. Superior on slopes. They are well-known and highly revered native trees. Forage source for the California Sister and California Hairstreak.

Plant Family: Fagaceae
Plant Type: Tree
Height by Width: 20-75' H x 30-60' W
Growth Habit: Broad dome shaped crown
Deciduous/Evergreen: Evergreen
Growth Rate: Moderate
Sun Exposure: Full sun
Soil Preference: Adaptable
Water Requirements: Drought-tolerant to occasional
Cold Hardy to: 10 degrees F
Flower Season: Spring
Flower Color: Acorns
Endangered?: Not Listed
Distribution: Outer North Coast Range, Central and Southwest, Baja
Natural Habitat: Valleys, slopes, mixed evergreen forest, woodland to 5,000'

Image:songbird_iconA.jpg Image:butterfly_iconA.jpg Image:clay_iconA.jpg Image:slope_iconA.jpg


Care and Maintenance


History
  • From California Native Plants, Theodore Payne's 1941 catalog: "A spreading round topped tree with rough gray bark and deep rich green foliage. The most beautiful of all trees; well suited for planting on hillsides, in parks, on lawns or any place where a spreading evergreen tree is desired. Recommended for street planting, some of the most beautiful streets in Pasadena are planted with this tree. For highway planting it has no equal, especially in the hilly sections where the tree is native. Under these conditions it should be planted irregularly, in groups and as single specimens tying in with the natural landscape. The Live Oak is not, as is generally supposed, a slow growing tree. If given water and ordinary care it will compare favorably with many of the other evergreen trees. Acorns planted in Glendale produce trees which at 14 years of age average 14 inches in diameter. Gallon cans, 50c; 5 gallon cans, $1.75; Boxed specimens, $5.00 to $10.00."
Other Names
References
  • Bornstein, Carol, David Fross, and Bart O'Brien. California Native Plants for the Garden. Los Olivos, CA: Cachuma Press. 2005.
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